Port Macquarie's growth evidenced by new supermarket and motel expansion

​Port Macquarie News, Thursday, November 28, 1968.

Enterprising: John Jones with Diane Wilson and her son in Jones’ Foodland Store on Owen Street, 1968.

Enterprising: John Jones with Diane Wilson and her son in Jones’ Foodland Store on Owen Street, 1968.

Jones’ Store opens in Horton Street

After 15 years successful trading in Port Macquarie, Jones’ are opening a new supermarket in Horton Street today.

They will still retain their Owen Street store. This well-known family has converted the former Macquarie Cafe into a modern self-service store, complete with new deep freeze and dairy cabinet units. Unlike some other supermarket-type enterprises credit facilities will be available on most lines, and a delivery service can be arranged.

As with the Owen Street store, the new supermarket will be part of the Foodlands group of stores, which purchase in bulk from wholesalers. This allows them to offer service and prices competitive with chain stores, and retain local ownership of the business.

The manager of the new shop, Mr John Jones, told the News he would strive to keep in close personal contact with his customers. He said statistics prove that service and friendliness are much more important than price. Mr Jones said he planned to have a back entrance to allow housewives to pick up their groceries by car instead of lugging them to the nearest parking space.

The ugly librarian

A proposal that the next council librarian be an ugly one was submitted by Ald N. Matesich at Tuesday night’s works committee. He was commenting on the resignation of Miss Lyn Prince on her pending marriage. Ald Matesich said that while it was very pleasant to have librarians who win beauty contests, an older and less attractive woman would be more stable. “You know, someone who has big eyes and wears glasses,” he said. Applications are being called for a librarian to succeed Miss Prince.”

Town growth: Extensions to the Royal Hotel-Motel in progress, 1968. Photos supplied by Port Macquarie Museum

Town growth: Extensions to the Royal Hotel-Motel in progress, 1968. Photos supplied by Port Macquarie Museum

Building figure approaches $4 Million

A total of $247,272 approved building applications were before Tuesday nigh’s meeting of the Works Committee of Port Macquarie’s Municipal Council. This lifted the total for the eleven months of 1968 to $3,737,357. Eighteen new dwellings were included in the applications, one set of brick veneer fiats and a new Masonic Temple. Extensions to Tom Bryant’s Macquarie and Royal Hotel-Motel by local builder Hastings Hicks are progressing. The additional 21 units, which are on the foreshore of the Hastings River, and command an excellent view of the harbour, are expected to be completed by Christmas.

Kenny attack “unfounded”

Statements detrimental to Port Macquarie in the city press, and attributed to J.L. Kenny, MLC, were described in the municipal council on Tuesday night as “completely unfounded”, and as an”utter disgrace.” 

The Sydney Sun, on November 15, published statements attributed to Mr Kenny that “Port Macquarie, one of the state’s most popular holiday resorts, is ‘on the nose’ and that the foreshores ‘absolutely stink’.” The Sun said Mr Kenny was leading a campaign for a better sewerage system for Port Macquarie. In a mayoral minute on Tuesday night, Ald Adams said, “never before has any action been taken to destroy more  tourist image of Port Macquarie than the damaging and completely unfounded article which appeared in the Sun”.

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