Spring sees a new-look shop and the Headland units adorn Port Macquarie's landscape

High-rise: Headlands building, Clarence Street, under construction, 1969. Photo supplied by Port Macquarie Museum.
High-rise: Headlands building, Clarence Street, under construction, 1969. Photo supplied by Port Macquarie Museum.

Headlands

Rising majestically amid the pine trees and towering above the camps and caravans is apartment block Headlands. It is being built for the Midson and York families in the best location in Port Macquarie off Clarence Street. To the north, the new units are almost directly over the harbour entrance and will command sweeping views of the coastline and from the Hastings River to the mountains.

Warning to surfers

The sudden change in the surfing area at Town Beach prompts this warning to bathers. The area has been sanding up slowly and at present the low tide tempts bathers to wander out through the shallows to body surf. This beach is unpatrolled, so parents of young children must be ever-watchful of their movements. However, some parents neglect their responsibilities by ignoring council signs placed at danger points on the beach.

One sign says: Board riders to the north - body surfers to the south of this sign. This plainly allows for the board rider to enjoy his sport without fear of anyone getting in his way. The other sign is strategically placed next to the breakwall's end, stating: Swimmers are warned of the danger of sharks at this location. Shark attacks have occurred in shallow water areas before and the mouth of the river presents a hungry shark with a feeding ground.

New shop on main street

It was the oldest shop in the main street - today it's the newest. The best way to appreciate Max and Jean Starr's new shop on Horton Street, is to take a look at it. The building is an eye-catcher in Spanish-colonial style and the interior is very tasteful with modern counters, comfortable and adequate seating in the shoe section, and pure wool carpet throughout.

The décor is delightful and the concealed lighting, aided by much natural light from the glassed archways, provides an extremely pleasant and congenial atmosphere.

In the men's and boy's wear section, a good deal of effort has been made to present the clothes of today to their best advantage, and shopping is a pleasure. Max and Jean Starr became owners of the 109-year-old Horton Street shop in 1962, and have since dreamed of bringing to life this new conception.

Trendy: Spanish-colonial curved archways feature in the front and side of Starrs newly renovated shop in Horton Street, 1969.

Trendy: Spanish-colonial curved archways feature in the front and side of Starrs newly renovated shop in Horton Street, 1969.

This story Flashback: High rise units first appeared on Port Macquarie News.

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