REAL AUSTRALIA

Six of the best: Life, done five different ways plus the ghosts of industry

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Five people, five challenges. Photo: Shutterstock

Five people, five challenges. Photo: Shutterstock

Hopefully you might get some quiet time on Sunday to enjoy some handpicked content from across the ACM network. Hopefully, you might get some quiet time on Sunday to enjoy some handpicked content from across the ACM network. Today meet five people our journalists have spent time with this week. Among them, two people who walk serious (SERIOUS) distances for distinctly different personal reasons; a man facing down life's challenges; a doggedly determined man who wanted answers from history; and a woman who is entirely comfortable with her career choice, much to the disillusionment of others.

TJ Porter says for the first few months of working in the sex industry she was afraid to show her face, now she is proudly vocal of who she is. Picture: Emma Hillier

TJ Porter says for the first few months of working in the sex industry she was afraid to show her face, now she is proudly vocal of who she is. Picture: Emma Hillier

DAILY ADVERTISER: 'My career as a sex worker'

TJ Porter was a member of the defence forces but found herself looking for a new career when she was medically discharged. The 25-year-old now describes herself as "a touring companion", which means she will often travel around NSW rather than stick to her home base in Canberra. Other people call her a sex worker. Either way, she proud of herself. READ ON

Sunrise casting Simon Morris' shadow on a tree. Photo: Simon Morris

Sunrise casting Simon Morris' shadow on a tree. Photo: Simon Morris

THE EXAMINER: Meet the 64-year-old with his sights set on 12,700km Triple Crown

Simon Morris lost 15 kilograms and wore through three pairs of shoes on his four-month hike from Springer Mountain, Georgia, to Mount Katahdin, Maine: the 3500km that make up the United States' Appalachian Trail. He spent the majority of that time in the drugged-like state that comes from exhaustion, exposure to the elements, and severe calorie-depletion. And he loves it. READ ON

HOMELESS: Uniting Ballarat client Leyton has recovered from a drug addiction.

HOMELESS: Uniting Ballarat client Leyton has recovered from a drug addiction.

BALLARAT COURIER: Housing, the latest of life's challenges Lleyton's staring down

Leyton is in housing limbo. It is an experience of living filled with feelings of uncertainty and frustration - one that is emotionally draining and has required an extensive amount of persistence and patience. A drug addiction caused Leyton to lose his job. His landlord sold the rental property he was living in after he fell behind in rent, leaving him homeless. But he has hope. READ ON

The steelworks caught artistic imaginations as well as the national interest, as this undated photographic portrait shows. Courtesy: NIHA

The steelworks caught artistic imaginations as well as the national interest, as this undated photographic portrait shows. Courtesy: NIHA

NEWCASTLE HERALD: The ghost of BHP still haunt the Hunter

September 30, marks the 20th anniversary of the day that the Broken Hill Proprietary Company closed its Newcastle steelmaking plant after 84 years of production. The passing of time means there is now a generation of young Novocastrians - as well as the thousands of people moving here in the meantime - who have never known the smoke and noise from 300 hectares of some of Australia's heaviest industry, just a few clicks out of the CBD. READ ON

Lucy Barnard found the south of Argentina to be incredibly beautiful but bitterly cold.

Lucy Barnard found the south of Argentina to be incredibly beautiful but bitterly cold.

THE CANBERRA TIMES: Lucy Barnard's 30,000km journey from Argentina to Alaska

Lucy Barnard went in search of adventure, but it was more than just a long-term holiday that took her halfway across the world. She has spent the past two-and-a-half years with one goal - to be the first woman to walk the length of the world - from the southern most tip of South America in Argentina to the tip of North America in Barrow, Alaska. She estimates she has about three years to go. READ ON

Mystery solved: John Walter Bissett-Amess, of Mount Warrigal, with the Catalina at HARS which is similar to the one his uncle was on board with nine other crew when it crashed in Irian Jaya. Picture: Greg Ellis.

Mystery solved: John Walter Bissett-Amess, of Mount Warrigal, with the Catalina at HARS which is similar to the one his uncle was on board with nine other crew when it crashed in Irian Jaya. Picture: Greg Ellis.

ILLAWARRA MERCURY: Closure, 76 years pilot's plane went missing

A Port Kembla WWII pilot's dog tags have been found in the Irian Jayan jungle 76 years after his plane went missing. Greg Ellis spoke to his nephew with the same name who says his family now has closure. READ ON

Enjoy Sunday.

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