Join the Australian Native Bee Association branch at Dunbogan

Buzz about bees: The Mid North Coast branch had its first meeting at the Jubilee Hall at Dunbogan. Photo: supplied.
Buzz about bees: The Mid North Coast branch had its first meeting at the Jubilee Hall at Dunbogan. Photo: supplied.

Bee enthusiasts, experts and novices are invited to join a new group which has launched at Dunbogan.

The group is a Mid North Coast branch of the Australian Native Bee Association (ANBA).

The branch's president Diane Norris said it's important people act, as bees are dying off at disturbing rates.

"Their decline is telling us something is profoundly wrong in the environment," she said.

Twenty two members of the branch met at the first meeting recently at Jubilee Hall, Dunbogan.

Meetings are on the first Thursday of every month from 7pm.

Native stingless bee: Tetragonula carbonaria. Photo: supplied.

Native stingless bee: Tetragonula carbonaria. Photo: supplied.

"Come along and enjoy learning about the wonders of one of the most important and amazing animals of our insect world," Diane said.

The aim of the local group is to spread the word about the importance of native bees. They will host experts for talks, workshops and members will be available for advice.

Diane said there's a distinction between native bees which are unique to Australia, in contrast to the honey bees which are European.

The native bees can be kept as pets, chiefly for pollination and ecological reasons.

Australia has more than 1600 species of native bees. Most are solitary, but 11 species are social stingless native bees of the genus Tetragonula.

Mid North Coast ANBA checking out hive design. Photo: supplied.

Mid North Coast ANBA checking out hive design. Photo: supplied.

Diane said two of the common species Tetragonula carbonaria and Tetragonula hockingsi are stingless.

The Tetragonula carbonaria is native to the local area. Diane said they would be perfect as pets for educational reasons and to entice people to learn about the smallest parts of nature.

The group also wants to educate people about better gardening practices.

"We really need to stop the insatiable use of pesticides," Diane said.

Meanwhile entomologist and ex-CSRIO research scientist Tim Heard is hosting a Native Bee Workshop on Thursday, November 14 from 10am unitl 4pm at the Lorne Recreational Centre.

For bookings or more information please contact Diane Norris on 0422 639 336.

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